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Inspecting Wheel Studs?

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    #16
    Unless BW changed suppliers, they used to be GLS Top Stud, not MSI.

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      #17
      Click image for larger version

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        #18
        TBH, that just makes me wonder if the red Loctite I applied on install even held up... though I haven't had a wheel fall off or a stud back out. Yet.
        '03.5 M3 SMG Coupe - Jet Black / Black

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          #19
          Originally posted by r4dr View Post
          TBH, that just makes me wonder if the red Loctite I applied on install even held up... though I haven't had a wheel fall off or a stud back out. Yet.
          I have removed wheel studs who used red loctite and it's a bitch! Gotta sit there with a torch for 45-90 seconds and you need to chase the threads with a tap before installing new studs.

          These studs def did not use loctite when they were installed.

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            #20
            I've used a bunch of different studs, and luckily never had one fail. This time around I'm using Motorsport Hardware studs/nuts through FCP Euro and plan on replacing them every 2 years through their warranty program.

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              #21
              Originally posted by S14 View Post
              I've used a bunch of different studs, and luckily never had one fail. This time around I'm using Motorsport Hardware studs/nuts through FCP Euro and plan on replacing them every 2 years through their warranty program.
              Huh, I've noticed that FCP has started selling aftermarket parts fairly recently. I may have to do the same!

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                #22
                To the question: You cannot inspect studs for impending failure - short of having a metallurgy lab (in fact I plan to send my current studs to a University metallurgy lab for inspection - arranged by a friend). As noted earlier - studs are wear items. Change them on a schedule. If you wait for failure - you'll get the failure you were waiting for.

                If you beat on studs with an impact wrench, cut your change interval in half.

                After looking extensively at all options - I went with MSI. Buy once, cry once.


                This is what semi-regular impact wrench beating with no torque stick gets. All of these failed mid-turn with costly damage (not my failure/car). Note the internal corrosion on all of them due to hairline cracks.

                Click image for larger version

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                  #23
                  Originally posted by timmo View Post

                  Huh, I've noticed that FCP has started selling aftermarket parts fairly recently. I may have to do the same!
                  They are starting to expand their catalog ever so slightly. There’s a decent amount of after market on there, but it’s nothing really worth to write home about except for maybe the MSi parts. Hopefully they continue to grow it, I don’t live too far away from them so I’m slowly switching to buying through them full time.

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                    #24
                    Originally posted by Estoril View Post
                    To the question: You cannot inspect studs for impending failure - short of having a metallurgy lab (in fact I plan to send my current studs to a University metallurgy lab for inspection - arranged by a friend). As noted earlier - studs are wear items. Change them on a schedule. If you wait for failure - you'll get the failure you were waiting for.

                    If you beat on studs with an impact wrench, cut your change interval in half.

                    After looking extensively at all options - I went with MSI. Buy once, cry once.


                    This is what semi-regular impact wrench beating with no torque stick gets. All of these failed mid-turn with costly damage (not my failure/car). Note the internal corrosion on all of them due to hairline cracks.

                    Click image for larger version

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                    Impact wrench loosening or tightening?
                    '03.5 M3 SMG Coupe - Jet Black / Black

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                      #25
                      Good Day All:

                      For those of you removing and installing 12mm X 1.5 wheel studs, here's a couple of tools you many want to consider. They also come in other sizes.


                      I like the fact the stud installer gives you the option to torque in the studs to specs. Pretty easy to use per Snap On's web site video.
                      Hope this helps.

                      Feff
                      MVP Track Time

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                        #26
                        Originally posted by Feffman View Post
                        Good Day All:

                        For those of you removing and installing 12mm X 1.5 wheel studs, here's a couple of tools you many want to consider. They also come in other sizes.


                        I like the fact the stud installer gives you the option to torque in the studs to specs. Pretty easy to use per Snap On's web site video.
                        Hope this helps.

                        Feff
                        Oh man. That would have made the job WAY easier. Definitely buying that kit for next time.

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                          #27
                          Great find Feff, and the price isn't bad either. I'm always worried about damaging the stud threads on install using the double nut method.

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                            #28
                            I've never had a failure but I switched to Core4motorsports press in studs.
                            There is some good info here
                            https://www.core4motorsports.com/tech

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                              #29
                              Originally posted by Nugs View Post
                              I've never had a failure but I switched to Core4motorsports press in studs.
                              There is some good info here
                              https://www.core4motorsports.com/tech
                              Awesome info. Press-in studs are definitely the way to go. The only catch IMO is changing the rear hub (and bearing while you're at it) is a PITA.

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                                #30
                                Originally posted by elbert View Post

                                Awesome info. Press-in studs are definitely the way to go. The only catch IMO is changing the rear hub (and bearing while you're at it) is a PITA.
                                Probably one of the few jobs that I'd have a shop do. Never again.

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